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CLICK HERE TO DISCOVER......Who invaded, raided and ruled Britain!

Missing EBL? Of course you are! Here are all of the questions we were planning to look at over the summer term...this is something you can still research and do at home.

 

You might want to make notes, answer the questions or simply enjoy the videos below.

 

Enjoy finding out about Great Britain and who raided, invaded, ruled and left their mark here.

 

 

Task: Find out who the Celts were. What was it like to live in Celtic Britain? Are there any parts of Celtic life that still exist in Britain today?

NC: changes in Britain from the Stone Age to the Iron Age

Golden Nuggets:

· There were three main branches of Celts in Europe – Brythonic, Gaulic and Gaelic. Brythonic Celts (Britons) settled in England.

· Some people can still speak Celtic languages such as Welsh and Gaelic.

· Most Celts were farmers, and they lived in houses that were round instead of square.

Task: Write about what was it like to live in Britain when the Romans invaded. Did they make it a better or worse place to live?

NC: the Roman Empire and its impact on Britain; Julius Caesar’s attempted invasion in 55-54 BC; successful invasion by Claudius and conquest, including Hadrian’s Wall

Golden Nuggets:
Julius Caesar first invaded Britain in 55 BC.
There were several battles between the Roman army and the Celtic tribes who lived in Britain at the time, but the Romans didn’t have a large enough army and they retreated.
The Roman army was one of the most successful armies in history and far more advanced than any other army at the time.

Task: How did the Anglo-Saxons come to rule over Britain? How did they change the history of Britain? What was life like as an Anglo-Saxon?

NC: Britain’s settlement by Anglo-Saxons and Scots; Anglo-Saxon invasions, settlements and kingdoms: place names and village life

Golden Nuggets:

· The Anglo-Saxons were the first people we would describe as English: modern English began with, and developed from, their speech.

· Saxon war tribes were hired to defend Britain when the Roman army left. So the Anglo-Saxons were originally invited immigrants.

· The Anglo-Saxons were made up of three tribes: the Angles, Saxons and Jutes.

Task: Why were the Vikings so fearsome? Why did they come to Britain? What legacy did they leave behind?

NC: the Viking and Anglo-Saxon struggle for the Kingdom of England to the time of Edward the Confessor; Viking raids and invasion

Golden Nuggets:

· Vikings attacked villages by the sea in England, Wales, Scotland and Ireland.

By 866 the Vikings made York the second biggest city in England.

· Places ending in ‘by’ ‘thorpe’ and ‘toft’ were built by Vikings.

Viking invaders and settlers | History - The Vikings

Suitable for teaching 7-11s. Archaeologist Neil Oliver visits Lindisfarne, Repton and York to trace the Viking invasion and settlement in Anglo Saxon England...

Viking home life | History - The Vikings

Suitable for 7-11s. Neil Oliver visits York, Denmark and Jarlshof in Shetland to see some extraordinary artefacts and explore the history of Viking life at h...

Normans: How did the death of Edward the Confessor lead to a fight for the throne? Who were the Normans? Who was William the Conqueror and why was his funeral memorable?

NC: the Viking and Anglo-Saxon struggle for the Kingdom of England to the time of Edward the Confessor


Golden Nuggets:
· The Normans came from northern France, and invaded England in 1066 after King Edward the Confessor died without leaving an heir to the throne.

· William the Conqueror published the Domesday Book, which tells us a lot about the people who lived in England in the 11th century.

· The Normans built stone castles – some of these are still standing today.

1066: The Battle of Fulford (2/6) | History - The Norman Conquest

For teacher notes and more history resources from BBC Teach: https://www.bbc.com/teach/class-clips-video/history-ks3-ks4-1066/zm3m382 In the first major batt...

1066: The Battle of Stamford Bridge (3/6) | History - The Norman Conquest

For teacher notes and more history resources from BBC Teach: https://www.bbc.com/teach/class-clips-video/history-ks3-ks4-1066/zm3m382 This clip details how, ...

1066: The Battle of Hastings (4/6) | History - The Norman Conquest

For teacher notes and more history resources from BBC Teach: https://www.bbc.com/teach/class-clips-video/history-ks3-ks4-1066/zm3m382 This animation details ...

How William the Conquerer secured power after 1066 (5/6) | History - The Norman Conquest

For teacher notes and more history resources from BBC Teach: https://www.bbc.com/teach/class-clips-video/history-ks3-ks4-1066/zm3m382 This clip looks at how ...

Revolt and resistance after 1066 (6/6) | History - The Norman Conquest

For teacher notes and more history resources from BBC Teach: https://www.bbc.com/teach/class-clips-video/history-ks3-ks4-1066/zm3m382 How did the Anglo-Saxon...

How William the Conquerer secured power after 1066 (5/6) | History - The Norman Conquest

For teacher notes and more history resources from BBC Teach: https://www.bbc.com/teach/class-clips-video/history-ks3-ks4-1066/zm3m382 This clip looks at how ...

Tudors: Who were the Tudors? Who was Henry VIII and why did he fall out with the Pope? What was it like to live in Tudor times? Who was Queen Elizabeth and how did she make her mark on history?

NC: a study of an aspect or theme in British history that extends pupils’ chronological knowledge beyond 1066; a significant turning point in British history



Golden Nuggets:

· The Tudor period is the period between 1485 and 1603. This was when the Tudors were the ruling family in England.

· The Tudor period is the period between 1485 and 1603. This was when the Tudors were the ruling family in England.

· The Tudor rose was created when Henry VII brought an end to the Wars of the Roses (an ongoing battle between two royal groups – the House of Lancaster and the House of York). He joined the White Rose of York with the Red Rose of Lancaster, creating the Union Rose (or Tudor Rose), which is still used as the floral emblem of England today.

Following his father’s death, Henry VIII became King of England in 1509 and ruled until his death in 1547. · Henry VIII is well known for his six marriages – and for having two of his wives beheaded. · Henry VIII formed the Church of England following an argument with the Pope about divorcing his first wife.

· The Tudors enjoyed eating different types of meat. But without fridges and freezers, they would preserve meat by rubbing salt on it.

· It was extremely dangerous to be a Catholic in Tudor times. Many priests had to hide or face the death penalty.

· Some of the boardgames the Tudors played are still enjoyed today, such as chess, backgammon and card games.
· Elizabeth I was Queen of England and Ireland from 17th November 1558 to 24th March 1603. She’s regarded as one of the greatest monarchs of England.
· Elizabeth proved to be a more tolerant ruler than her half-sister Mary and tried to make England a fairer place for everyone. ·Elizabeth refused to marry, saying, “I am already bound unto a husband which is the Kingdom of England”.

What was Queen Victoria’s legacy? What was the British Empire and how big was it?

NC: the changing power of monarchs using case studies such as Victoria



Golden Nuggets:

· Ruling for over 60 years, Victoria would become the longest reigning British Monarch, and Queen of the biggest empire in history. During her time as Queen, the British Empire included Australia, New Zealand, Canada, South Africa and India.

· Victoria and Albert had a whopping nine children together – their names were Victoria, Edward, Alice, Alfred, Helena, Louise, Arthur, Leopold and Beatrice.

· Albert died in December 1861, when the Queen was 42 years old. The Queen never recovered from his death, and dressed in black as a sign of mourning for the rest of her life.

 

 

Who were the Celts and why did they invade Britain?

NC: changes in Britain from the Stone Age to the Iron Age

 

Golden Nuggets:

· There were three main branches of Celts in Europe –

Brythonic, Gaulic and Gaelic. Brythonic Celts (Britons)

settled in England.

· Some people can still speak Celtic languages such as

Welsh and Gaelic.

· Most Celts were farmers, and they lived in houses that

were round instead of square.

 

How did the Romans invade Britain?

NC: the Roman Empire and its impact on Britain; Julius Caesar’s

attempted invasion in 55-54 BC; successful invasion by

Claudius and conquest, including Hadrian’s Wall

 

Golden Nuggets:

· Julius Caesar first invaded Britain in 55 BC. There were

several battles between the Roman army and the Celtic

tribes who lived in Britain at the time, but the Romans

didn’t have a large enough army and they retreated.

· The Roman Empire was cut in half by a pair of Caesars.

· The Roman army was one of the most successful armies in

history and far more advanced than any other army at the

time.

 

How did the Anglo-Saxons take over Britain?

NC: Britain’s settlement by Anglo-Saxons and Scots; Anglo-Saxon

invasions, settlements and kingdoms: place names and village

life

 

Golden Nuggets:

· The Anglo-Saxons were the first people we would describe

as English: modern English began with, and developed

from, their speech.

· Saxon war tribes were hired to defend Britain when the

Roman army left. So the Anglo-Saxons were originally

invited immigrants.

· The Anglo-Saxons were made up of three tribes: the

Angles, Saxons and Jutes.

 

Why were the Vikings so fearsome?

NC: the Viking and Anglo-Saxon struggle for the Kingdom of England to the time of Edward the Confessor; Viking raids and invasion

 

Golden Nuggets:

· Vikings attacked villages by the sea in England, Wales, Scotland and Ireland.

· By 866 the Vikings made York the second biggest city in England.

· Places ending in ‘by’ ‘thorpe’ and ‘toft’ were built by Vikings.

 

Normans: How did the death of Edward the Confessor lead to a fight for the throne?

 

NC: the Viking and Anglo-Saxon struggle for the Kingdom of England to the time of Edward the Confessor

 

Golden Nuggets:

· The Normans came from northern France, and invaded England in 1066 after King Edward the Confessor died without leaving an heir to the throne.

· William the Conqueror published the Domesday Book, which tells us a lot about the people who lived in England in the 11th century.

· The Normans built stone castles – some of these are still standing today.

 

Tudors: Who were the Tudors?

NC: a study of an aspect or theme in British history that extends pupils’ chronological knowledge beyond 1066; a significant turning point in British history

 

Golden Nuggets:

· The Tudor period is the period between 1485 and 1603. This was when the Tudors were the ruling family in England.

· The Tudor period is the period between 1485 and 1603. This was when the Tudors were the ruling family in England.

· The Tudor rose was created when Henry VII brought an end to the Wars of the Roses (an ongoing battle between two royal groups – the House of Lancaster and the House of York). He joined the White Rose of York with the Red Rose of Lancaster, creating the Union Rose (or Tudor Rose), which is still used as the floral emblem of England today.

 

Tudors: Who was Henry VIII and why did he fall out with the Pope?

NC: a study of an aspect or theme in British history that extends pupils’ chronological knowledge beyond 1066; a significant turning point in British history

 

Golden Nuggets: · Following his father’s death, Henry VIII became King of England in 1509 and ruled until his death in 1547. · Henry VIII is well known for his six marriages – and for having two of his wives beheaded. · Henry VIII formed the Church of England following an argument with the Pope about divorcing his first wife.

 

Tudors: What was it like to live in Tudor times?

NC: a study of an aspect or theme in British history that extends pupils’ chronological knowledge beyond 1066; a significant turning point in British history

 

Golden Nuggets:

· The Tudors enjoyed eating different types of meat. But without fridges and freezers, they would preserve meat by rubbing salt on it.

· It was extremely dangerous to be a Catholic in Tudor times. Many priests had to hide or face the death penalty.

· Some of the boardgames the Tudors played are still enjoyed today, such as chess, backgammon and card games.

 

Tudors: Who was Queen Elizabeth and how did she make her mark on history?

 

NC: a study of an aspect or theme in British history that extends pupils’ chronological knowledge beyond 1066; a significant turning point in British history

 

Golden Nuggets: · Elizabeth I was Queen of England and Ireland from 17th November 1558 to 24th March 1603. She’s regarded as one of the greatest monarchs of England. · Elizabeth proved to be a more tolerant ruler than her half-sister Mary and tried to make England a fairer place for everyone. · Elizabeth refused to marry, saying, “I am already bound unto a husband which is the Kingdom of England”.

 

Victorians: What was Queen Victoria’s legacy?

 

NC: the changing power of monarchs using case studies such as Victoria

 

Golden Nuggets:

· Ruling for over 60 years, Victoria would become the longest reigning British Monarch, and Queen of the biggest empire in history. During her time as Queen, the British Empire included Australia, New Zealand, Canada, South Africa and India.

· Victoria and Albert had a whopping nine children together – their names were Victoria, Edward, Alice, Alfred, Helena, Louise, Arthur, Leopold and Beatrice.

· Albert died in December 1861, when the Queen was 42 years old. The Queen never recovered from his death, and dressed in black as a sign of mourning for the rest of her life.

 

What was the Battle of Britain?

 

NC: a study of an aspect or theme in British history that extends pupils’ chronological knowledge beyond 1066 -the Battle of Britain

 

Golden Nuggets:

· The Battle of Britain was a military campaign of the Second World War, in which the Royal Air Force (RAF) defended the United Kingdom (UK) against large-scale attacks by Nazi Germany's air force, the Luftwaffe. It has been described as the first major military campaign fought entirely by air forces.

· The British officially recognise the battle's duration as being from 10 July until 31 October 1940, which overlaps the period of large-scale night attacks known as the Blitz, that lasted from 7 September 1940 to 11 May 1941.

· Air raid sirens would warn people to go to the nearest Anderson shelter to stay safe. There was a blackout in the country at night time and lots of children were evacuated from cities to the countryside.

 

 


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